Until recently, a sales person’s toolkit included email, phone, maybe even some type of screen share technology. Meanwhile, marketing technology outpaced sales years ago: Since the early 2000s, marketing professionals have enjoyed things like website optimization tools, A/B testing, detailed performance statistics, and advanced lead scoring products. But thanks to technology slowly moving to the cloud, many more sales teams can more easily track and analyze the data in their phone and email systems — and make more informed decisions.

Just in time to get ready for a record-breaking 2018! The Top Sales Tools of 2017 Guide: Final Cut is where you’ll find the best sales tech for growing revenue. Use our Smart Selling Tools’ Guide to learn about innovative tools designed for any kind of seller.

You’ll find detailed information on top selling tools for:
– Account-Based Selling
– Sales Enablement & Engagement
– Sales Management, Coaching, & Training
– and more

One of the best experiences from Dreamforce 2017 was not on the official Dreamforce agenda – the Sales Enablement Soiree, an off-site lounge held at the Four Seasons. In just two years, the Soiree has become the go-to spot at Dreamforce for all things Sales Enablement related.

During this one-day event, attendees could talk to and see demonstrations of twelve different Sales Enablement solutions including MindTickle, Highspot, Node, Allego, and BigTinCan.

Oh, year-end analysis. How I love thee and hate thee. Let me count the ways…

This is the time of year when executives become hyper-sensitive to numbers and are asking a flurry of questions.

What revenue will we close the year with?
What was our ROI on that new tech investment?
What did we do this past year that was most effective at moving the needle?

Your prospects want to succeed as much as you do. And they want to boost their companies — and hopefully their own careers — in the process. So, if your offer will help them succeed, why wouldn’t they call you back immediately and sign now? If something’s good for you, surely you should want it!

Your prospect has a tough job. She must convince her organization and relevant stakeholders (the proverbial average of 5.5 internal stakeholders) that change is a good thing. She must build a business case and balance the cost, risk, and effort associated with that change. She must own the results post-purchase. And she must accomplish all of this while doing her day job.

The Sales analytics category has exploded in recent years, both in number and diversity.  A recent industry round-up listed 50+ providers, and the list continues to grow.  Metrics are the bedrock of any sales function (in fact, one could argue that no enterprise function is tracked, measured and analyzed more than sales!)

When your customer is ready to sign, you want to close the deal ASAP—not be slowed by a paper-based signing process. And yet that’s exactly what happens in many organizations. According to an IDC report, Bridging the Document Disconnect in Sales, although most business today is digital, 56 percent of executives still rely on paper to sign contracts and close deals.

We can immediately begin to understand and categorize how companies of different sizes, industries, sales-cycles, and sales models make use of SalesTech and how they develop their sales stack over time. 

If you want to know how your company compares to similar companies in its use of SalesTech, we ask that you go and take this survey today and to share it with others. You’ll receive a copy of the final report at no charge. You’ll also receive a participation gift (valued at $199) immediately upon completing the survey.

Sales enablement is a hot topic at the moment, and a key priority for many sales organizations. Yet, as an industry, we’re failing badly at it. According to the CSO Insights 2016 Sales Enablement Optimization Study, 32.7% of surveyed organizations had a sales enablement function in 2016 (up from 25.5% in 2015), but only 5.2% of surveyed companies said that sales enablement was meeting all expectations.

One reason for this failure is confusion about what exactly sales enablement should be enabling. The obvious answer to the question is that enablement should enable more winning. But what, exactly, does that entail?