Sales has come a long way from going door-to-door with a stack of encyclopedias or schmoozing with executives over a game of golf. Today, every business has the capability to reach out to millions of potential customers on a global scale. But the world of selling hasn’t stopped moving. In fact, it’s speeding up.

The last two decades have seen spectacular advances in sales and marketing software, and business software of all types, thanks in large part to the transformative power of the cloud. By lowering the financial barrier to entry to moving the responsibility for security and maintenance to the vendor to the automation of upgrades, the cloud has delivered a long list of benefits to sales and marketing users.

In this series, we ask tech executives to describe the why and how of their solution. We call it Sales Tech Simplified. This week I interview Mohit Garg, Co-Founder & CRO of MindTickle. Nancy: Why does the industry need your solution? Mohit: In the digital age, sales organizations need an agile way to keep their reps up to speed and fully prepared. There are three industry trends that are driving this need.

In this series, we ask tech executives to describe the why and how of their solution. We call it Sales Tech Simplified. This week I interview Ian Levine, Chief Sales Officer of RO Innovation. Nancy: Why does the industry need your solution? Ian: The modern B2B buying journey has evolved. The internet has given buyers greater access to information. To cut through the noise and madness, buyers are turning to their peers for answers…peers they trust and know have felt the same frustrations.

The original intent of Account Based Marketing (ABM) was to align marketing and sales, and it’s served its purpose as a launching point for getting organizations to recognize that alignment is critical for a successful go-to-market strategy. But does it really foster alignment? As organizations implement ABM strategies, some of the model’s shortcomings are brought to light.

Last year my wife purchased a new Jeep Grand Cherokee.  She did her research up front. Before she ever walked into the dealership she knew more about Jeep Grand Cherokees than the people selling them. She knew exactly what she wanted: silver exterior, dark leather interior, navigation system, and sun-roof.

She’d compared prices across multiple dealers and her research was neatly arranged in a folder. The only thing left was the obligatory test drive.

Product marketing professionals find themselves as the lynchpin between Product, Marketing, and Sales. However, most functions are notorious for not investing enough time in supporting sales efforts. Sure, they are effective at product launches and using feature/benefit language, but they often fall short when it comes to effectively enabling their their sales team.

While this stigma can be true, it would be wrong to assume that product marketers don’t want to help their sales team.